Apr 272013
 

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This interesting recipe comes from several sources.  I first saw it in Costco’s magazine.  I didn’t try it because quite honestly, the combination of ingredients seemed too strange.  Really?  Watermelon and jalapeños?  Too weird.

But then my friend, Nina, made it and brought it to work.  I was smitten!   I bought the ingredients that week and made it for my family, who proceeded to devour a whole bowl of it in lightning speed.

So, although it is not the kind of ingredients that you can keep on hand so that you can just throw it together, it is worth a special trip to the grocery store to make it.   And it is super simple, whether you use a chopper, as I have, or simply chop with your trusty knife.  Whatever way you go with it, it is fast and easy—and usually disappears about as quickly as it takes to make it.

I have seen several variations of it online, so you can make it however you think you would desire.   I made it this time with the amounts as listed.  Feel free to double up on jalapeños or cut way back, depending on your bravery for hot peppers.

I especially LOVE it on fish tacos.  On chips, on broiled chicken breasts.  I am hopeless in its presence.  Sometimes I just grab a spoon and eat a bowl of it.  Which is perfectly alright for you too!

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3 green onions, sliced thinly

1 green pepper, chopped

¼ cup jalapeños (I used the “sliced in the jar” variation, but you can use fresh)

About 3 cups of seedless watermelon, chopped into small cubes

¼ lime, squeezed

Cilantro, as desired (or not, if you don’t love it)

Dash of garlic salt—more or less as desired

Thinly slice the green onions.

Chop the watermelon, jalepenos and green pepper.

Squeeze one quarter of a fresh lime.

Chop a few sprigs of fresh cilantro– or not, if you don’t like it.

Sprinkle with about 1/4 t. of garlic salt, more or less to taste.

Mix all the ingredients and chill.  Or, can be served immediately.  It is better if given time to meld the flavors and chill, but you may not be able to wait.  I can’t.

Serve as salsa or as an appetizer.  Makes about four cups.

Watermelon Salsa (AKA Fire and Ice)

Watermelon Salsa (AKA Fire and Ice)

Ingredients

  • 3 green onions, sliced thinly
  • 1 green pepper, chopped
  • ¼ cup jalapeños (I used the “sliced in the jar” variation, but you can use fresh)
  • About 3 cups of seedless watermelon, chopped into small cubes
  • ¼ lime, squeezed
  • Cilantro, as desired (or not, if you don’t love it)
  • Dash of garlic salt—more or less as desired

Instructions

  1. For detailed pictured directions, go to: [http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/watermelon-salsa-aka-fire-and-ice/]
  2. Thinly slice the green onions.
  3. Chop the watermelon, jalepenos and green pepper.
  4. Squeeze one quarter of a fresh lime.
  5. Chop a few sprigs of fresh cilantro-- or not, if you don't like it.
  6. Sprinkle with about 1/4 t. of garlic salt, more or less to taste.
  7. Mix all the ingredients and chill. Or, can be served immediately. It is better if given time to meld the flavors and chill, but you may not be able to wait. I can’t.
  8. Serve as salsa or as an appetizer. Makes about four cups.
http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/watermelon-salsa-aka-fire-and-ice/

 Posted by at 9:25 pm
Apr 222013
 

I suppose that many families have traditional recipes that have been passed down the generations.  My Mom’s family has this breakfast recipe that I grew up with and loved—for as long as I can remember.  I have never heard of anyone else making it, but if you recognize this concoction, please comment so we can find out if we are related.

Mom tells me that her Aunt Agnes made it.  And Aunt Agnes—well, Aunt Agnes has been gone a long time.  So the origins of this rich breakfast creation continue to be a mystery.

It is pronounced GON cheese.  I even had to invent the spelling because I have never seen anyone spell it.  I added the “i” so it looked foreign because my Slavic relatives invented it– at least I think they did.  And surprise!  My spell check had no suggestions (Mild disappointment to me.)

I best describe it as scrambled pancake batter, but it is richer than pancakes.  More eggs, more fat.  I often wonder if it was invented from a failed pancake batch and an abundance of eggs from the family chicken house.

I remember watching my Mom eat it by taking a spoonful and drenching it in her coffee cup until the clumps of cooked batter soaked up some of the black coffee.   That always looked good to me, except that I did not like coffee and to this day, still do not like it.  But you can try it—if you like coffee with a sweet pastry, you likely will find this a tasty practice.

My favorite way to eat it is with maple syrup and a dusting of regular sugar, mostly to add a little texture. (Okay,  why lie?  I love sweets)   And as you can tell from the pictures, it is not particularly pretty.  I suspect that my Aunt Agnes did not care much whether it was suitable for photographing.  They were mostly concerned with keeping their family fed during The Great Depression.

I make it now for my grandkids, who enjoy it—with lots of syrup, as most kids would. My son even made it when he was away at college.  And now my two daughters make it for their families.

A new twist—my oldest daughter, Paige, made it using coconut oil in the pan.  It gives it a slightly  coconutty flavor to the dish—one that makes me forget that I am counting calories.  Epic fail.   And if you too are counting calories, don’t make this unless you have plenty of mouths to feed.  Otherwise, it will call your name from the leftover section of your fridge.  Because this is one breakfast dish that reheats perfectly.

So consider yourself warned.  Hopefully, your kids and grandkids will save you from yourself!

(Oh, and this recipe is easily halved, if you wish.)

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Simple, common ingredients

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gonchiese

2 1/2 cups flour

1/2 cup sugar

1/4 t. salt

1 t. baking powder

6 eggs

2 cups milk

5 T. shortening (Butter Flavor Crisco or coconut oil)

Heat a large electric frypan to 400 degrees.  Add solid shortening  or coconut oil.

Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl.

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Combine milk and eggs and beat until well combined.

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Stir liquid ingredients into the dry, beating with an egg beater or electric mixer.  Mix until all lumps are gone.100_1894

 

 

 

 

 

Once the frypan is heated, carefully pour batter into the center of the pan.

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Allow the mixture to cook until the bottom is browned.

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Gently lift the batter to allow the uncooked batter to slide to the underside.  Flip the cooked side.

Allow the batter to brown one more time.   Next, using the spatula or spoon, “scramble” the batter to form chunks, stirring as you break it up.

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See– I told you it isn’t pretty!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turn the pan down to 300 degrees.  Cover and allow to cook until none of the batter remains and all the clumps are cooked through.  Allow to cook for another few minutes.

Turn pan down to warm.

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Serve in bowls with syrup, a dusting of sugar, or, dipped into your morning coffee, as shown.

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Refrigerate leftovers.  Can be reheated in the microwave.

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Share with the grand littles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Here is the Ziplist version for you:

 

Gonchiese—a family mystery food.

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 t. salt
  • 1 t. baking powder
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 cups milk
  • 5 T. shortening (Butter Flavor Crisco or coconut oil)

Instructions

  1. For detailed and pictured directions, go to: {http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/gonchiese-our-mystery-family-breakfast-recipe/}
  2. Heat a large electric frypan to 400 degrees. Add solid shortening or coconut oil.
  3. Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  4. Combine milk and eggs and beat until well combined.
  5. Stir liquid ingredients into the dry, beating with an egg beater or electric mixer. Mix until all lumps are gone.
  6. Once the frypan is heated, carefully pour batter into the center of the pan.
  7. Allow the mixture to cook until the bottom is browned, as shown.
  8. Gently lift the batter to allow the uncooked batter to slide to the underside. Flip the cooked side.
  9. Allow the batter to brown one more time. Next, using the spatula or spoon, "scramble" the batter to form chunks, stirring as you break it up.
  10. Turn the pan down to 300 degrees. Cover and allow to cook until none of the batter remains and all the clumps are cooked through. Allow to cook for another few minutes.
  11. Turn pan down to warm.
  12. Serve in bowls with syrup, a dusting of sugar, or, dipped into your morning coffee, as shown.
  13. Refrigerate leftovers. Can be reheated in the microwave.
http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/gonchiese-our-mystery-family-breakfast-recipe/

 

 

 Posted by at 10:35 pm
Apr 162013
 

Whole Wheat bread-via your bread machine

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If you’ve read my “about me” page, you will know that I am married to a rancher.  We raise beef, barley and wheat.  So you can assume that I have as much beef and wheat as a person would want.

Any you would be right.

A while back, I decided that I would like to grind my own wheat so that I can bake whole wheat bread for my hubbie who happens to like the 100% whole wheat recipe.  I am a city girl, so naturally, I tend toward the white variety.  I often don’t eat the crusts, either, for whatever that is worth.  Maybe it is because I am a little bit spoiled.

So a while back we kept some wheat from a crop that had a very high protein content.  Maybe you don’t know that wheat comes in different qualities.  Depending on the weather, the soil and things like the timing of the precipitation, the wheat will have certain qualities that make if more or less valuable.   One quality that most consistently brings a higher price is the percentage of protein.  A higher protein wheat is more valuable for breads, so since this is wheat’s most common use, a high protein crop is worth more to the farmer.   Coincidentally, the higher protein often happens when there is less rain, a bonus (sort of) when the yields are lower.

The wheat that we saved was 17% protein.  We had it cleaned (more or less) and put in barrels or buckets so that we could use is for our personal needs.  I say more or less, because I still have to watch for an occasional grasshopper head or wheat stalk that made it through the process.

The recipe that I use is 100% whole wheat flour, which is usually pretty dense, but this one is exceptionally light.  I even like it, and I am mostly a white only fan of bread.

I will post pics starting from the grain—you can use store bought whole wheat flour.  If you grind your own, this uses about 3 cups of wheat.

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ready for the grinding

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finished product

 

Whole Wheat Bread

 

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Your ingredients for this recipe

1 2/3 cups water (at about 75 degrees)

2 T. butter or margarine

1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar

2 t. salt

4 2/3 cups whole wheat flour

3 t. yeast

Place all the ingredients except the yeast into your bread pan.

Make a small well into the flour; add yeast to this little hole.

Place into the bread machine.

Select the dough cycle and start.  Monitor the kneading so that the dough is not too sticky or too dry.  Dough should be soft but not “dragging” around the paddle.  If it is too dry, add a bit of water, 1 T. at a time.

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make sure your dough is soft but still spins easily

 

Once the first rising is done, remove the dough.  Allow the dough to rest for 10 minutes.

 

Divide into two parts, shape into two loaves and place into greased pans. (Or, as I like to do, into four small loaves)  Lightly grease the tops with oil or spray on shortening to keep them from drying out.

 

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Cover with a light towel and allow to rise for about 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

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Place bread pans in the center of the oven.  Bake two loaves for about 30 – 35 minutes.  (Four loaves in about 20 minutes)  Here is my best advice- babysit your oven, checking every 10 minutes after the first 15 minutes.   Every oven and pan is different!  Don’t sabotage your work by not checking the bread for doneness.   The crust should be firm and sound a bit hollow when you tap it.  If you lift the bread a bit in the pan, the underside should be browned, not doughy.

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Allow to cool on a rack—if you must indulge right away, be sure to slice with a serrated knife!  You will most likely disfigure your perfect loaf, but it will be worth it nonetheless.  This is quite possibly where we get the saying,

“A slice of heaven.”

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Here is the Ziplist version for you:

Whole Wheat Bread-via your bread machine!

Whole Wheat Bread-via your bread machine!

Ingredients

  • 1 2/3 cups water (at about 75 degrees)
  • 2 T. butter or margarine
  • 1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 2 t. salt
  • 4 2/3 cups whole wheat flour
  • 3 t. yeast

Instructions

  1. For detailed, pictured directions, go to: [http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/whole-wheat-bread-via-your-bread-machine/]
  2. Place all the ingredients except the yeast into your bread pan.
  3. Make a small well into the flour; add yeast to this little hole.
  4. Place into the bread machine.
  5. Select the dough cycle and start. Monitor the kneading so that the dough is not too sticky or too dry. Dough should be soft but not “dragging” around the paddle. If it is too dry, add a bit of water, 1 T. at a time.
  6. Once the first rising is done, remove the dough. Allow the dough to rest for 10 minutes.
  7. Divide into two parts, shape into two loaves and place into greased pans. (Or, as I like to do, into four small loaves) Lightly grease the tops with oil or spray on shortening to keep them from drying out.
  8. Cover with a light towel and allow to rise for about 1 hour.
  9. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  10. Place bread pans in the center of the oven. Bake two loaves for about 30 – 35 minutes. (Four loaves in about 20 minutes) Here is my best advice- babysit your oven, checking every 10 minutes after the first 15 minutes. Every oven and pan is different! Don’t sabotage your work by not checking the bread for doneness.
  11. Allow to cool on a rack—if you must indulge right away, be sure to slice with a serrated knife! You will most likely disfigure your perfect loaf, but it will be worth it nonetheless.
  12. Heavenly-- quite possibly where the saying, "A slice of heaven" comes from!
http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/whole-wheat-bread-via-your-bread-machine/

 

Apr 142013
 

trike

 

When we first met, I was not unlike most girls I knew.  Riding horseback seemed like the most idyllic endeavor a girl could pursue.  For David, however, riding a horse meant work.  Days spent moving cows to summer pastures was not always a fond experience, so saddling up two horses for a “pleasure ride” was not on HIS radar.  Horses were work and a necessary part of cattle ranching.

And since David’s 1991 bout with Transverse Myelitis, this cowboy hasn’t ridden a horse for over 20 years.  As you might imagine, if he had normal legs, he probably would jump at a chance now.  (If you are new to my blog, you may want to click here for more background.)

However, he has traded his reigns for chains— bicycle chains, that is.

And his bicycle?  Well, his bicycle isn’t really a bicycle.  In fact, it has three wheels, so technically, it is a tricycle.

So yes, I fell in love with a cowboy (who preferred NOT to ride horses) and ended up with a guy who rides a bicycle—or rather, a tricycle.

Seriously, you say?  Yes, seriously.  And since David “sat down,” his bike riding has become a very serious endeavor.

We bought the trike in 1996.  It set us back $1200 for a 36 gear hand cycle that was a demo model.  The color?  Candy purple.  How very inappropriate for a cowboy.  But very appropriate for a penny pinching cowboy.

The first few years, he didn’t ride it much.  I privately growled to myself about spending so much money on such frivolity.  But as the years have passed, he took a more active, or should I say, passionate interest in it.   Now, he rides it faithfully whenever the skies allow, many times logging over 1,000 miles a year on it.  There have been times when he trails behind our cows as we move them to the lake pasture.  But most of the time, he rides on the highway that runs alongside our wheat fields.

But I must tell you, it has not been without some of the same dangers that trotting on a horse would present.  Four times he has broken his legs while doing his ride. The last break was his right femur. His right femur–if that did not shock you, let me inform you that the femur (thigh bone) is the biggest bone in your body.  Additionally, he has acquired pressure sores from the friction this generates on his cheeks. (Let me explain: when you cannot feel your butt, you aren’t getting the signals that tell you that you are assaulting your skin.  Thus, the birth of a pressure sore.  I am arguing with myself as to whether to tell you more about this in another post.)  But each break has a story worth telling—these definitely will go to press.

Broken bones, pressure sores —all this from using your arms to accomplish what legs normally do. (I have tried to ride this contraption—it is a challenge to push enough to motion forward.)

And then there are the people who ask me, “Why do you let him do this?” (Like I could hide it from him or tell him NO!)   I suppose they consider it dangerous to ride a trike on a major highway.  The stories about the injuries do make most people cringe. They think me to be apathetic or cavalier about the safety my husband.

I tell them that I forsook my protestations years ago.  It simply doesn’t accomplish anything to nag at him.  I liken it to preventing a cow dog from herding cattle—it is just too essential to him for me to “yank his chain.”

So, if the day’s weather seems to be cooperating enough, then ride, he will.  I suppose that there are cowboys that have similar sentiments about riding their horse.

Not to say that we haven’t made changes to reduce the risk.  Since the transfer from wheelchair to trike has resulted in three of the four breaks, we rigged up a swing set with overhead slings so that David can pull himself up and over to make the transfer.

Now since riding a horse was never really one of David’s passions, he has not yet attempted to saddle up and ride since he “sat down and rolled”.  Not to say that he wouldn’t give it a shot.  But given that riding a trike does so much to fill his quest for normalcy, why “fix what ain’t broke”?  And although we would hope to “fix” all that is broken in his body, we will ride this one out, even though we would wish for a different “ride” or even better yet, “a walk in the park”.  Call it what you wish, our life continues and our dreams and faith endure.  The cows and horses, hayfields and a tricycle.  Not the picture we chose, but one that we do not hesitate to call blessed.

Oh, and riding those horses?  No longer a pursuit of mine.   I’ll ride a four-wheeler or walk behind the herd of cows before I’ll get on a saddle.  Sometimes what seems so very keen to a 17 year old passes with time and circumstances.   Possibly wisdom overrules romance?  Or perhaps it is because walking behind a herd of cows is the best way to burn calories or to savor the simple pleasures of life that we all take for granted.

Now that, I am NOT cavalier about.

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 Posted by at 4:41 pm
Apr 132013
 

So when I posted about “marrying the man I love, but married into the life I love”,  I found out that, yes, people like my recipes, but they seem to want to read about the ingredients of my life.  While I still have many more recipes in me, I will oblige and post more about our somewhat out-of-the-ordinary life.

 

So, here is an expansion of a previous post:

 I “married” the man I love, but “married into” the life I love

 

Most people associate a rancher with cows, horses and ropes.  I did, especially when I was 17 years old and a city girl.

Even though I lived in Helena, Montana, I was as “citified” as any city girl could be.

So when I determined that this handsome guy, David, was going to be my next boyfriend, I soon discovered that “citified”– he was not.

I knew that he wore cowboy boots, which most of the other boys did not.  I knew that he liked country music, which I did not.  I also knew that he worked hard most every day, which the other boys and I both did not.

David lived a different life than I did.  I knew very little about cows, horses and wheat and barley.  David seemed to know everything about the aforementioned.  We would go check on the cows that needed watering during the hot summer months.  He would arrive at my house with the water truck and we would wind our way up into the gulch until we got to the spot where we would open the spigot to fill the rusty trough.  He would then proceed to tell me the history of each of the cows and heifers that we were watching.  (Never mind that I had no clue what a heifer and a steer was and never fessed up until many years into our marriage.  I eventually put two and two together through observation.)

Later in that summer, we would take his 1972 Pontiac Ventura down to north side of the ranch where I would watch him flood irrigate a portion of what they called the section hayfield.  As I batted the mosquitoes, David trudged through the soggy soil with shovel and dam in hand, looking at the lay of the land and the gravity pull of the water flow to estimate where the dam needed to be placed across the ditch.  If you aren’t following what I am describing, then you are likely as ignorant about farming and irrigation as I was.  I could explain more, but it might be easier if you read here about “flood irrigation” to see about this age-old skill.

But if you find this all to be quite boring, you are not like I was.  Or, at least there is no leading man in the picture to draw you into the story. For me, not only was it interesting, but the leading man was a handsome cowboy to boot.

By the summer’s end, I had decided that this boyfriend that I chose in May, was a cowboy that I had grown to love.  I even remember the day that I decided that it was he that I loved.  And where it happened.

It was not as we gazed at a picturesque Montana sky, nor when we rode on horseback into the fading sunset.  David did not even like to ride horses– that fantasy faded in childhood when cows were moved miles away to mountain pasture and horses was the best way to make it happen.  No, riding horses- though a dreamy pursuit to me- was at the bottom of David’s “things I like to do” list.

Nope, it was none of those.   It was a day when I watched him flood irrigate that hayfield.  Like a bolt of lightning— it was not. Nor was it a flood of emotion that stole my senses or enveloped my heart.

More like a moment of truth.  A moment when I realized that David was who I wanted and his life was the life I wanted to live. It was a realization that this 17 year old farmer possessed a work ethic and maturity that made my respect morph into a love that would eventuate into marriage.

And marriage it did become, in the summer of 1975.

So as the nursery rhyme goes, first comes love, then comes marriage, then comes a baby in a baby carriage. We soon had three children, a dog and a “home on the range.”

Now as life goes, sometimes you hit a curve.  In 1991, when David was finishing the wheat harvest, a pervasive numbness that began in his feet soon turned into a piercing pain in his back.  Within 5 days, he went from a strapping 35 year old farmer, to a complete T-11 paraplegic.  What began as a frightening ride to the local emergency room eventually ended with a 6 week stay in the hospital.  With a diagnosis of temporary paralysis called Guillian Barre‘ (what we now know was incorrect), we went home to expect a gradual return of his motor and sensory function.

A “return” that never returned.

So, the truth is:  medicine is an art, not science.  Neurology is sometimes  a practice of guessing what lab work cannot accurately define.  David’s paralysis diagnosis proved NOT to be temporary, but instead, permanent.  It was called something we had never heard of: Transverse Myelitis.

So cry, we did.  Lament, we did.  Our prayers were a combination of crying and lamenting. And the return we received was not what we hoped for.  For indeed, the paralysis remained and the eventual diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis added insult to injury.  My faith in my God was tripped by this painful repeat of my own history; for my own father’s life was cut short to 45 years by this same disease.  I had to press in to regain my faith; trust and lean on God, a God who made heaven and earth – yet who allowed MS to assault our lives.

As I write this, I ponder the evolution of the last 20 years since “David sat down”.  We raised our three kids.  They have married and produced grandkids for us to adore.  We have built a wheelchair accessible home that is above any or all dreams that I would have dreamt.  We often lie in bed at night and say to each other how good our life is.  Gratefulness has often been the antidote to the self pity that creeps in when we face any new challenges or defeats.

But so far, 38 years since our wedding day, we continue to live and love in Montana.  And, because God has kept us, we have remained faithful to each other and to Him.

DAVID_&_ARLENE_232

 

More to come– why my “cowboy rides a tricycle”

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Apr 082013
 

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Hamburger Cheese Bake

As you may or may not have concluded by now, my recipes are pretty simple and use common ingredients.  Nonetheless, simple and common does not mean that a recipe is boring or unappealing.  Sometimes I am surprised how rearranging the simple creates a really popular and oft requested recipe.  This recipe epitomizes this:

Hamburger Cheese Bake

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This is one of my go-to recipes when I need something quick and easy for a potluck or when I am making a meal to go.  It is universally liked and oft requested.  Simple, easy and tried and true.  Period.

Need I say more? (I could, but let’s make this post simple and easy)

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Simple, common ingredients

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hamburger Cheese Bake

1 pound ground beef

½ cup chopped onion

1 15oz. can tomato sauce

1 t. sugar

¾ t. salt

¼ t. garlic salt

¼ t. pepper

4 cups uncooked noodles

1 c. cottage cheese

1 8 oz. package cream cheese, softened (you can halve this to save calories, or use Neufchatel cheese.)

¼ cup sour cream

1/3 cup sliced green onion

¼ cup chopped green pepper

Parmesan cheese for topping (optional)

Brown hamburger and onion in soup pot:  See why I fry in my..  Cook until onion is tender.

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Drain.

Add tomato sauce, sugar, salt, garlic salt, and pepper.

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Bring to boil and remove from heat.

Meanwhile, cook noodles according to directions and drain.

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Don’t overcook the noodles– undercook is better!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combine cheeses and sour cream with green onion and green pepper.

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Spread half the noodles in an 11x 7 inch pan.

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Top with half of the meat sauce.

Cover with cheese mixture.

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Top with remaining noodles and meat sauce.

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Sprinkle with parmesan cheese.

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Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

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Makes about 8 – 10 servings.

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Hamburger Cheese Bake

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • 1 15oz. can tomato sauce
  • 1 t. sugar
  • ¾ t. salt
  • ¼ t. garlic salt
  • ¼ t. pepper
  • 4 cups uncooked noodles
  • 1 c. cottage cheese
  • 1 8 oz. package cream cheese, softened (you can halve this to save calories, or use Neufchatel cheese.
  • ¼ cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup sliced green onion
  • ¼ cup chopped green pepper
  • Parmesan cheese for topping (optional)

Instructions

  1. For detailed and pictured directions, please go to: www.onlymybestrecipes.com/hamburgercheesebake/
  2. Brown hamburger and onion in soup pot: See why I fry in my.. Cook until onion is tender.
  3. Drain.
  4. Add tomato sauce, sugar, salt, garlic salt, and pepper.
  5. Bring to boil and remove from heat.
  6. Meanwhile, cook noodles according to directions and drain.
  7. Combine cheeses and sour cream with green onion and green pepper.
  8. Spread half the noodles in an 11x 7 inch pan.
  9. Top with half of the meat sauce.
  10. Cover with cheese mixture.
  11. Top with remaining noodles and meat sauce. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese.
  12. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.
  13. Makes about 8 – 10 servings.
http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/hamburger-cheese-bake/

 Posted by at 7:33 pm
Apr 032013
 

Grandma Marge’s Baked Beans

100_1826-001My mom makes the very best baked beans in the whole wide world!

I really believe that!

That doesn’t mean that I don’t enjoy other variations; it’s just that none are as delicious as mom’s.

There are a couple of additions that set it apart—molasses and liquid smoke.  It is a bit like cheating and I suppose REAL Boston Baked Beans would start with raw beans that soak overnight.

But hear me again; I like simple recipes with common ingredients.  And so, this recipe meets the criteria.

We did the math and quadrupled this in huge roaster ovens for my oldest daughter’s wedding.  While I recommend actually baking the beans so that the sauce reduces and the top caramelizes a bit, this recipe certainly works for serving large crowds in this manner.  This recipe gets rave reviews whenever I serve it.  Luckily, my mom wrote up a recipe for me—she always made it with the “a little of this and a little of that” style.  But when we wanted to serve it for the wedding,  she sat down and did some measuring.

So here it is.  Enjoy with most anything, or, add some polish sausages or hot dogs and make it a main attraction!  Either way, be ready to share the recipe (or, you can always do like mom: tell them, a little of this and a little of that…).

Grandma Marge’s Baked Beans

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The ingredients

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 53 oz. cans of pork and beans (or 1 #10 size can)

2/3 cups chopped onion

½ cup molasses

2/3 cup catsup

1 cup brown sugar

¼ cup prepared mustard

2 t. liquid smoke

Combine all ingredients.

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Pour  into a  deep 13×9 in. pan.  I like to use stoneware, but most any pan will work.  Do not cover.

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Place in 350 degree oven and bake for 1- 1-1/2 hours or until it thickens.

Or, this can be baked in a crock pot for several hours.  You will not get the thickened product, but the flavor will be good.  If you prefer a thickened result, drain off some of the liquid from the beans before combining with the other ingredients.  Do the same when preparing for a large crowd in a roaster oven.

Grandma Marge’s Baked Beans– simply the best.

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 35 minutes

1 gallon beans

Grandma Marge’s Baked Beans– simply the best.

Ingredients

  • 2 53 oz. cans of pork and beans (or 1 #10 size can)
  • 2/3 cups chopped onion
  • ½ cup molasses
  • 2/3 cup catsup
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup prepared mustard
  • 2 t. liquid smoke

Instructions

  1. For detailed and pictured directions, go to: [www.onlymybestrecipes.com/grandmamarge'sbakedbeans/]
  2. Combine all ingredients in large bowl.
  3. Pour into a deep 13x9 in. pan. I like to use stoneware, but most any pan will work. Do not cover.
  4. Place in 350 degree oven and bake for 1- 1-1/2 hours or until it thickens.
  5. Or, this can be baked in a crock pot for several hours. You will not get the thickened product, but the flavor will be good.
  6. If you prefer a thickened result, drain off some of the liquid from the beans before combining with the other ingredients. Do the same when preparing for a large crowd in a roaster oven.

Notes

Great recipe for cooking for crowds!

http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/grandma-marges-baked-beans-simply-the-best/

 

 Posted by at 6:12 pm
Apr 012013
 

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Beirocks—a tasty bun stuffed with beef and cabbage

100_1698

Beirocks- a German beef and cabbage roll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have never liked sandwiches.  I don’t like to eat them (but I will) and I don’t like to make them (but I will).

But be that as it is, sandwiches are quite convenient for lunches.  It is sort of hard to put a casserole into a baggie and pack it for lunch.

So I’m thinking that this is why I decided to try this recipe from my Betty Crocker’s International Cookbook.

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They are a German sort of pastry and are a favorite at my house.  Don’t let the cabbage scare you—it is delicious in this setting!

I use the same bread machine recipe as I use in the dough doggies.

Here are the ingredients that you will need:

 

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Note:  After you start the bread machine, start on the “stuffing” which is listed below.

This recipe uses  my “Fab-Fave White Bread” dough for bread machines.  Here it is:

1 c. milk, warmed a little or at room temperature

1 egg

¼ c. sugar

1 t. salt

1 T. yeast

Place these ingredients in the bread pan and swirl together until the yeast is dissolved.

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Then, add:

3 c. flour

¼ c. shortening (again, I like Butter Flavor Crisco, for the flavor and color)

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Run the dough cycle of your machine, checking it to make sure that the dough is not too sticky (add a tablespoon of flour if it is.)

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Dough here is a bit too sticky– add a tablespoon of flour

Don’t just start the cycle and not check the process—monitor the dough.  I often “help” it along in the beginning, pushing the flour with a rubber spatula to get it started.  Maybe I do this because I have literally worn out about 3 machines.  (My best advice:  start with less flour to begin with, adding more as needed)

Once the dough cycle is completed, drop the dough out on the counter, cover it and allow it to rest for 10 minutes.

After you start the bread machine, start on the “stuffing”

1 lb. ground beef

4 cups shredded cabbage

1 small onion, chopped

¼ cup water

1 ½ t. salt

1/8 t. pepper

Brown the hamburger with the onion.

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Stir in cabbage, water, salt and pepper.

Heat till boiling.

Reduce heat and simmer until cabbage is tender, about 10 minutes.

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Drain very well and cool.

To assemble:

Roll out the bread dough, about 12 x18 inches rectangle (approximately)

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Using a pizza cutter, cut the square into 12 squares.

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Top each square with about ¼ cup of the beef mixture until each has about the same amount of topping.

Pinch corners of each square together.  Then pull remaining edges together.

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Cup each ball in your hand and compress, making sure that the dough is sealed.

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Place seam side down onto a greased shiny cookie sheet, making sure they are evenly spaced.

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Cover and allow to rise for about 1 hour.

Heat oven to 375 degrees.

Bake until light brown, about 20 – 25 minutes.

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While hot, brush with margarine or butter.  Serve with condiments—David likes a horseradish/mayo combo.  Can be served hot or cold.

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Yumm.  Very yummm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beirocks—a tasty bun stuffed with beef and cabbage

Beirocks—a tasty bun stuffed with beef and cabbage

Ingredients

  • 1 c. milk, warmed a little or at room temperature
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ c. sugar
  • 1 t. salt
  • 1 T. yeast
  • 3 c. flour
  • ¼ c. shortening (again, I like Butter Flavor Crisco, for the flavor and color)
  • Stuffing:
  • 1 lb. ground beef
  • 4 cups shredded cabbage
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 ½ t. salt
  • 1/8 t. pepper

Instructions

  1. For detailed and pictured directions, go to: [http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/beirocks-a-tasty-bun-stuffed-with-beef-and-cabbage/]
  2. Start with: My “Fab-Fave White Bread” dough for bread machines. Once your bread machine has started, make the “stuffing” recipe.
  3. Place all ingredients except flour and Crisco into the bread pan and swirl together until the yeast is dissolved.
  4. Then, add the flour and shortening.
  5. Run the dough cycle of your machine, checking it to make sure that the dough is not too sticky (add a tablespoon of flour if it is.) Don’t just start the cycle and not check the process—monitor the dough. I often “help” it along in the beginning, pushing the flour with a rubber spatula to get it started. (My best advice: start with less flour to begin with, adding more as needed)
  6. Once the dough cycle is completed, drop the dough out on the counter, cover it and allow it to rest for 10 minutes.
  7. Brown the hamburger with the onion.
  8. Stir in cabbage, water, salt and pepper.
  9. Heat till boiling.
  10. Reduce heat and simmer until cabbage is tender, about 10 minutes.
  11. Drain very well and cool.
  12. To assemble:
  13. Roll out the bread dough, about 12 x18 inches rectangle (approximately)
  14. Using a pizza cutter, cut the square into 12 squares.
  15. Top each square with about ¼ cup of the beef mixture until each has about the same amount of topping.
  16. Pinch corners of each square together. Then pull remaining edges together.
  17. Cup each ball in your hand and compress, making sure that the dough is sealed.
  18. Place seam side down onto a greased shiny cookie sheet, making sure they are evenly spaced.
  19. Cover and allow to rise for about 1 hour.
  20. Heat oven to 375 degrees.
  21. Bake until light brown, about 20 – 25 minutes.
  22. While hot, brush with margarine or butter. Serve with condiments—David likes a horseradish/mayo combo. Can be served hot or cold.
http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/beirocks-a-tasty-bun-stuffed-with-beef-and-cabbage/

 

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 Posted by at 6:48 am
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