A BBQ sauce that anyone CAN master. (Hint, if you can open a can of tomato paste, you CAN make this)

 

IMG_0295Years ago I decided that I was craving some pork ribs.  I baked the ribs, drained off the fat and realized that I was running really late.   I needed to get the sauce made and then get out the door to who knows whatever reason, so I re-engineered the recipe.  I read over the ingredients, rounded them up or down and concluded that my empty tomato paste can would be my measuring cup today.  After all, Rachel Ray doesn’t seem to measure anything, so why can’t I?

I wasn’t too certain as to how my experiment would work.  I wasn’t very brave then. I hoped for the best. I have to say, though, it was liberating to toss the can into the trashcan when I was done.  A quick spoonful of the final product tasted fairly good, but this was BEFORE it was on the ribs. I would wait with baited breath.  Whatever that means…

So I dumped the truncated recipe onto the already cooked ribs and tossed them back into the oven.  Said a prayer, probably, and then headed out the door. returning an hour and a half later, I was not disappointed.  In fact, quite ecstatic!  My Rachel-esque experiment yielded a wonderful sweet/sour/spicy rib that pleased both me and my David.  And all this with minimal time and clean up.

And now,  this is the only method that I use to make BBQ sauce. It’s delicious with beef round steak, chicken and beef ribs, too.   And to make another confession, I have even used some as a tasty add-in to soups that lack pizzazz.  (Hint: save  what’s leftover in the pan, add bit of the meat and add some vegetables to some canned stock)

I often make it up in double batches and keep it in the fridge for a second meal assembly.  After all, it takes more time to get out the ingredients than it does to measure and clean up (I mean toss) the mess.

And as you know, it fits my recipe objectives:  it is simple and uses common ingredients.   Rachel would be proud. I think.

Simple “Can Do” BBQ Sauce

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4-6 lbs. of cooked ribs, chicken or beef*  (see cooking directions below)

1 6 oz. can of tomato sauce

1 can water

1 can brown sugar

1 can ketchup

3/4 can white vinegar

1 can chopped onion

2 T. prepared mustard (or, two dollops if you don’t want to measure)

1 1/2 t. salt

1 clove of garlic or 1/4 t. minced garlic (from a jar, because I never use up fresh garlic  before it spoils)

1 t. (about) of red pepper flakes (optional)

Start by roasting the meat, which takes about 1 1/2 to 2 hours.  While the meat is cooking, open the tomato paste can.  Empty the paste into a medium mixing bowl.  Next, measure one can of water, add to the bowl.  Next, measure the brown sugar, then the ketchup, then the vinegar.  Chop the onion (about a can’s worth) and add it to the bowl.  Now finish with the mustard and seasonings.  Stir well.

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Pour over pre-cooked spare ribs, short ribs, chicken or round steak.  Bake at 350 degrees for about 1 1/2 hours.

*To cook the ribs, chicken or beef, place in a roaster pan or stoneware (as I have done).  Salt and pepper.  Cover loosely with foil, poke holes into the foil to allow steam to escape.  Roast meat for 2 hours or until mostly cooked.  Remove from pan and drain off fat.  Replace the meat into the pan and generously cover with the sauce.  Return to the oven and cook for another 1 to  1 1/2 hours at 350 degrees.  Check  periodically and remove if the sauce gets too browned.  Cut into serving pieces and serve with plenty of napkins.

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A BBQ sauce that anyone CAN master. (Hint, if you can open a can of tomato paste, you CAN make this)

A BBQ sauce that anyone CAN master.  (Hint, if you can open a can of tomato paste, you CAN make this)

Ingredients

  • 1 6 oz. can of tomato paste
  • 1 can water
  • 1 can brown sugar
  • 1 can ketchup
  • 3/4 can white vinegar
  • 1 can chopped onion
  • 2 T. prepared mustard (or, two dollops if you don't want to measure)
  • 1 1/2 t. salt
  • 1 clove of garlic or 1/4 t. minced garlic (because I never use up fresh garlic before it spoils)
  • 1 t. (about) of red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 4-5 lbs roasted meat-- ribs, round steak or chicken

Instructions

  1. For detailed directions and pictures, go to: [http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/a-bbq-sauce-that-anyone-can-master-hint-if-you-can-open-a-can-of-tomato-paste-you-can-make-this/]
  2. *Start by roasting the meat, which takes about 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
  3. While the meat is cooking, open the tomato paste can.
  4. Empty the paste into a medium mixing bowl.
  5. Next, measure one can of water, add to the bowl.
  6. Next, measure the brown sugar, then the ketchup, then the vinegar.
  7. Chop the onion (about a can's worth) and add it to the bowl.
  8. Now finish with the mustard and seasonings. Stir well.
  9. Pour over pre-cooked spare ribs, short ribs, chicken or round steak. Bake at 350 degrees for about 1 1/2 hours.
  10. *To cook the ribs, chicken or beef, place in a roaster pan or stoneware (as I have done).
  11. Salt and pepper the meat.
  12. Cover loosely with foil, poke holes into the foil to allow steam to escape.
  13. Roast meat for 2 hours or until mostly cooked.
  14. Remove from pan and drain off fat.
  15. Replace meat into the pan and generously cover with the sauce.
  16. Return to the oven and cook for another 1 to 1 1/2 hours at 350 degrees.
  17. Check periodically and remove if the sauce gets too browned.
  18. Cut into serving pieces and serve with plenty of napkins.
http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/a-bbq-sauce-that-anyone-can-master-hint-if-you-can-open-a-can-of-tomato-paste-you-can-make-this/

 

 Posted by at 2:23 pm

  2 Responses to “A BBQ sauce that anyone CAN master. (Hint, if you can open a can of tomato paste, you CAN make this)”

  1. Sounds delicious! I’ll have to try this sometime :) Any success with it in the crockpot?

    PS. Visiting as a fellow classmate from Blogelina’s Blogging Class! :)

    • Yes, I have made it in the crockpot. The results are different. You don’t get the “carmelized” action of baking it in the oven. I must admit, though, that I have often cheated and used the crockpot method. I cook the ribs first, drain very well and then add the sauce and cook again. Results will vary based on the crockpot temperature and size. If the pot is too small, you get a boiled effect– not so delish. I tend to use a bigger pot for a recipe like this. Believe it or not, I own 4 different crockpots for this very reason!
      Thanks for the comment. I will visit your site soon!

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