Apr 162013
 

Whole Wheat bread-via your bread machine

100_1571

If you’ve read my “about me” page, you will know that I am married to a rancher.  We raise beef, barley and wheat.  So you can assume that I have as much beef and wheat as a person would want.

Any you would be right.

A while back, I decided that I would like to grind my own wheat so that I can bake whole wheat bread for my hubbie who happens to like the 100% whole wheat recipe.  I am a city girl, so naturally, I tend toward the white variety.  I often don’t eat the crusts, either, for whatever that is worth.  Maybe it is because I am a little bit spoiled.

So a while back we kept some wheat from a crop that had a very high protein content.  Maybe you don’t know that wheat comes in different qualities.  Depending on the weather, the soil and things like the timing of the precipitation, the wheat will have certain qualities that make if more or less valuable.   One quality that most consistently brings a higher price is the percentage of protein.  A higher protein wheat is more valuable for breads, so since this is wheat’s most common use, a high protein crop is worth more to the farmer.   Coincidentally, the higher protein often happens when there is less rain, a bonus (sort of) when the yields are lower.

The wheat that we saved was 17% protein.  We had it cleaned (more or less) and put in barrels or buckets so that we could use is for our personal needs.  I say more or less, because I still have to watch for an occasional grasshopper head or wheat stalk that made it through the process.

The recipe that I use is 100% whole wheat flour, which is usually pretty dense, but this one is exceptionally light.  I even like it, and I am mostly a white only fan of bread.

I will post pics starting from the grain—you can use store bought whole wheat flour.  If you grind your own, this uses about 3 cups of wheat.

100_1537

100_1539

ready for the grinding

100_1542

finished product

 

Whole Wheat Bread

 

100_1547
Your ingredients for this recipe

1 2/3 cups water (at about 75 degrees)

2 T. butter or margarine

1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar

2 t. salt

4 2/3 cups whole wheat flour

3 t. yeast

Place all the ingredients except the yeast into your bread pan.

Make a small well into the flour; add yeast to this little hole.

Place into the bread machine.

Select the dough cycle and start.  Monitor the kneading so that the dough is not too sticky or too dry.  Dough should be soft but not “dragging” around the paddle.  If it is too dry, add a bit of water, 1 T. at a time.

100_1549

make sure your dough is soft but still spins easily

 

Once the first rising is done, remove the dough.  Allow the dough to rest for 10 minutes.

 

Divide into two parts, shape into two loaves and place into greased pans. (Or, as I like to do, into four small loaves)  Lightly grease the tops with oil or spray on shortening to keep them from drying out.

 

100_1550

100_1552

 

 

100_1555

Cover with a light towel and allow to rise for about 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

100_1557

Place bread pans in the center of the oven.  Bake two loaves for about 30 – 35 minutes.  (Four loaves in about 20 minutes)  Here is my best advice- babysit your oven, checking every 10 minutes after the first 15 minutes.   Every oven and pan is different!  Don’t sabotage your work by not checking the bread for doneness.   The crust should be firm and sound a bit hollow when you tap it.  If you lift the bread a bit in the pan, the underside should be browned, not doughy.

100_1566

 

100_1571

Allow to cool on a rack—if you must indulge right away, be sure to slice with a serrated knife!  You will most likely disfigure your perfect loaf, but it will be worth it nonetheless.  This is quite possibly where we get the saying,

“A slice of heaven.”

Subscribe to only my BEST recipes

Here is the Ziplist version for you:

Whole Wheat Bread-via your bread machine!

Whole Wheat Bread-via your bread machine!

Ingredients

  • 1 2/3 cups water (at about 75 degrees)
  • 2 T. butter or margarine
  • 1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 2 t. salt
  • 4 2/3 cups whole wheat flour
  • 3 t. yeast

Instructions

  1. For detailed, pictured directions, go to: [http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/whole-wheat-bread-via-your-bread-machine/]
  2. Place all the ingredients except the yeast into your bread pan.
  3. Make a small well into the flour; add yeast to this little hole.
  4. Place into the bread machine.
  5. Select the dough cycle and start. Monitor the kneading so that the dough is not too sticky or too dry. Dough should be soft but not “dragging” around the paddle. If it is too dry, add a bit of water, 1 T. at a time.
  6. Once the first rising is done, remove the dough. Allow the dough to rest for 10 minutes.
  7. Divide into two parts, shape into two loaves and place into greased pans. (Or, as I like to do, into four small loaves) Lightly grease the tops with oil or spray on shortening to keep them from drying out.
  8. Cover with a light towel and allow to rise for about 1 hour.
  9. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  10. Place bread pans in the center of the oven. Bake two loaves for about 30 – 35 minutes. (Four loaves in about 20 minutes) Here is my best advice- babysit your oven, checking every 10 minutes after the first 15 minutes. Every oven and pan is different! Don’t sabotage your work by not checking the bread for doneness.
  11. Allow to cool on a rack—if you must indulge right away, be sure to slice with a serrated knife! You will most likely disfigure your perfect loaf, but it will be worth it nonetheless.
  12. Heavenly-- quite possibly where the saying, "A slice of heaven" comes from!
http://www.onlymybestrecipes.com/whole-wheat-bread-via-your-bread-machine/

 

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers